Keyword: Animal Protection

News of ban on dog meat at notorious Yulin festival may be unreliable

News of ban on dog meat at notorious Yulin festival may be unreliable

Dogs are reportedly kept and slaughtered in inhumane conditions before the festival. The controversial Yulin Lychee and Dog Meat Festival takes place every June in the southern Chinese province of Guangxi, but animal rights organizations have claimed that this year’s activities may not go as planned. The week-long festival will begin this year on June 21, but Humane Society International and Duo Duo Animal Welfare Project have recently announced that city officials are finally taking steps to stop the inhumane treatment of dogs in conjunction with the festival. Yulin residents have eaten dog meat and lychee on the summer solstice for generations, but it was not until 2010 that the …read more

Weibo post sparks national inquiry into illegal pangolin smuggling

Weibo post sparks national inquiry into illegal pangolin smuggling

Indigenous to Africa and most of Southern and Eastern Asia, pangolins are a species of scale-covered mammals that resemble anteaters. The scaly critters are prized in Chinese cuisine and traditional medicine for their supposed healing qualities. In addition, their scaly hides are sought after as decorations and ornamental objects. Due to overhunting and global climate change however, pangolins have become one of the most threatened species on the planet. In 2014, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature categorized all species of pangolin as being threatened with extinction, with two species critically endangered. Killing, consuming, or selling pangolins in China is illegal and punishable by up to ten years …read more

Tsinghua professor chastises the public’s indifference towards human life

Three weeks ago, a man surnamed Zhang was mauled to death by tigers in Ningbo Zoo after scaling a wall to avoid paying the zoo’s entrance fee. Police shot and killed one of the tigers during the rescue operations, but Zhang was unfortunately beyond help by the time they could reach him. On Chinese websites and social media many people argued that the tiger should not have been shot because it was just doing what was natural to it, and that it was the man’s fault for climbing over the wall in the first place. Last week, Professor Sun Liping of Tsinghua University’s Sociology Department wrote a long post on …read more

Public meeting marks International Snow Leopard Day in Beijing

Public meeting marks International Snow Leopard Day in Beijing

An organization known as the “Snow Leopard Guardians” organized a public meeting in Beijing’s 798 Art District to mark International Snow Leopard Day on October 23rd. Experts on snow leopard research and protection, staff from foundations and social organizations and even a few artists working on installations related to the snow leopard attended and discussed creative ways to protect snow leopards from extinction. The activity helped the audience learn more about the snow leopard and become more aware of the significance of environmental conservation. A charity bazaar was also held at the scene, in which a great number of works of art, books and paintings of snow leopards were on …read more

China’s first Internet movie on philanthropy shot, with giant pandas as its theme

The filming of Protect the Panda Village, China’s first internet philanthropy movie in the form of a reality show, began in Chengdu’s famous giant panda breeding-base on August 15th. The movie records the life of six “panda village protectors” over seven days and six nights, during which they go into the primeval forest to get to know the living condition of pandas and their companion animals, visit local residents to find out about their lives, and experience the much-envied activity of feeding pandas. The six girls who play the role of protectors, with an average age of 23, were selected out of 156 panda-lovers. The movie is made by the Eudemonia Bank …read more

China’s rules on freeing captive wild animals and using animal products as medicine amended

An amendment to China’s Wild Animal Protection Law was voted through in the 21st session of the twelfth NPC standing committee. The top two issues addressed by the amendment are whether the products of wild animals under key protection in China can be used as medicine, and the rules about freeing captive wild animals. The Wild Animal Protection Law was officially enacted in March 1989, and since then it has been amended twice in 2004 and 2009, but these amendments only concerned some specific changes in the phrasing. This year’s amendments on the other hand are more substantial. Zhai Yong, the director of the Act Office of the Environmental and …read more

IFAW praises China for completely prohibiting imports of African ivory

IFAW praises China for completely prohibiting imports of African ivory

  (Beijing, China, March 23, 2016) According to an announcement by China’s State Forestry Administration, China will extend the validity of the prohibition on importing African ivory carvings and monuments presented in the Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) in 2015. The period of this prohibition will commence on March 20, 2016 and continue until December 31, 2019. The Chinese government has also made an interim decision to prohibit the import of ivory and derived products before the commencement date of the CITES. These decisions have earned the praise of the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW, www.ifaw.org.cn). In order to save endangered elephants, China has destroyed …read more

“Free the Smiling Angels

“Free the Smiling Angels” Project to protect finless porpoises

The start of the “Free the Smiling Angels” Project was officially announced yesterday by the Tianjin Fishery Administration Office in Tianjin’s Haichang Polar Ocean Park. On the same day two adorable wild finless porpoises called Yangyang and Xiaohua were successfully released into their home, the Yellow Sea. Finless porpoises are a kind of aquatic mammal closely related to dolphins. They are known for the wide smiles which they appear to maintain all the time. As Liu Qing, head of the local Institute of Zoology, explained: “finless porpoises are very lovely and like to be intimate with human beings. I feel very happy to see them gradually recover. I hope that more …read more